Upgrading Java version to JDK 8 in Cloudera Quickstart

This extends Installing & getting started with Cloudera QuickStart on VMWare for windows to upgrade the Java version from 1.7.x to 1.8.x. Firstly, check if your Cloudera version supports Java 1.8. This example is running on Cloudera 5.12.

Step 1: Power on the VMWare and login to “Cloudera Manager”. You can check the versions by clicking on the “Support” -> “About”.

Cloudera Manager About page

The current Java version is 1.7.x.

Current Java Version

Check the Cloudera site to see what versions of Java are supported before upgrading. Cloudera express 5.12 supports Java 1.8.x. So, let’s upgrade to Java 1.8.x.

Step 2: Open a terminal window in VMware.

VMWare terminal window

Step 3: Stop the “Cloudera Quickstart services” & the “Cloudera Management Service” via the UI.

Stop all Quickstart & management services

Step 4: Stop all the Cloudera manager agents via a terminal window.

Step 5: Stop the Cloudera manager server via a terminal window.

Step 6: Download the JDK 8 from “http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/jdk8-downloads-2133151.html” and save the JDK 8 for Linux 64 RPM in “/home/cloudera/Downloads/jdk-8u144-linux-x64.rpm”.

Download & save JDK 1.8 for Linux as an rpm file

Step 7: Install the RPM via a terminal window.

Finish the installation. The new version gets written to “/usr/java/jdk1.8.0_144” folder.

Step 8: Set the “~/.bashrc” file in the home directory (i.e. cd ~) with a new JAVA_HOME and Path via a terminal window.

After adding the above lines at the end of “~/.bashrc” run the following.

Now, if you run “java -version”, it should display “Java 1.8.x”.

Step 9: Update “cloudera-scm-server” file in “/etc/default”. You need to go in as a root user with “sudo su -“.

Add the following line to “cloudera-scm-server” file above the “export CMF_JAVA_OPTS” line.

Step 10: Start the Cloudera Manager server and the agents that were previously stopped via a terminal window.

Step 11: Login to the “Cloudera Manager via the UI” with “cloudera/cloudera” and select “Hosts” –> “All Hosts” –> “Configuration” and then search for “Java”. Set the “Java Home Directory” to newly installed Java version folder “/usr/java/jdk1.8.0_144”.

Cloudera Manager config “Java Home Directory”

Step 12: Start the Cloudera Quickstart services via the UI.

Step 13: Start the Cloudera Management Service via the UI.

Step 14: Check the version now via the Cloudera Manager UI. “Support” -> “About”.

Cloudera Manager About Versions


Why & What are the benefits

🎯 Why java-success.com?

🎯 What are the benefits of Q&As approach?

Learn by categories such as FAQs – Core Java, Key Area – Low Latency, Core Java – Java 8, JEE – Microservices, Big Data – NoSQL, Architecture – Distributed, Big Data – Spark, etc. Some posts belong to multiple categories.

BigData on Cloudera
Module 1 Installing & getting started with Cloudera Quick Start-
Unit 1 Installing & getting started with Cloudera QuickStart on VMWare for windows in 17 steps  - Preview
Unit 2 ⏯ Cloudera Hue, Terminal Window (on edge node) & Cloudera Manager overview  - Preview
Unit 3 Understanding Cloudera Hadoop users  - Preview
Unit 4 Upgrading Java version to JDK 8 in Cloudera Quickstart  - Preview
Module 2 Getting started with HDFS on Cloudera+
Unit 1 ⏯ Hue and terminal window to work with HDFS  - Preview
Unit 2 Java program to list files in HDFS & write to HDFS using Hadoop API  - Preview
Unit 3 ⏯ Java program to list files on HDFS & write to a file in HDFS  - Preview
Unit 4 Write to & Read from a csv file in HDFS using Java & Hadoop API  - Preview
Unit 5 ⏯ Write to & read from HDFS using Hadoop API in Java  - Preview
Module 3 Running an Apache Spark job on Cloudera+
Unit 1 Before running a Spark job on a YARN cluster in Cloudera  - Preview
Unit 2 Running a Spark job on YARN cluster in Cloudera  - Preview
Unit 3 ⏯ Running a Spark job on YARN cluster  - Preview
Unit 4 Write to HDFS from Spark in YARN mode & local mode  - Preview
Unit 5 ⏯ Write to HDFS from Spark in YARN & local modes  - Preview
Unit 6 Spark running on YARN and Local modes reading from HDFS  - Preview
Unit 7 ⏯ Spark running on YARN and Local modes reading from HDFS  - Preview
Module 4 Hive on Cloudera+
Unit 1 Getting started with Hive  - Preview
Unit 2 ⏯ Getting started with Hive  - Preview
Module 5 HBase on Cloudera+
Unit 1 Write to HBase from Java  - Preview
Unit 2 Read from HBase in Java  - Preview
Unit 3 HBase shell commands to get, scan, and delete  - Preview
Unit 4 ⏯ Write to & read from HBase  - Preview
Module 6 Writing to & reading from Avro in Spark+
Unit 1 Write to an Avro file from a Spark job in local mode  - Preview
Unit 2 Read an Avro file from HDFS via a Spark job running in local mode  - Preview
Unit 3 ⏯ Write to & read from an Avro file on HDFS using Spark  - Preview
Unit 4 Write to HDFS as Avro from a Spark job using Avro IDL  - Preview
Unit 5 ⏯ Write to Avro using Avro IDL from a Spark job  - Preview
Unit 6 Create a Hive table over Avro data  - Preview
Unit 7 ⏯ Hive table over an Avro folder & avro-tools to generate the schema  - Preview
Module 7 Writing to & reading from Parquet in Spark+
Unit 1 Write to a Parquet file from a Spark job in local mode  - Preview
Unit 2 Read from a Parquet file in a Spark job running in local mode  - Preview
Unit 3 ⏯ Write to and read from Parquet data on HDFS via Spark  - Preview
Unit 4 Create a Hive table over Parquet data  - Preview
Unit 5 ⏯ Hive over Parquet data  - Preview
Module 8 Spark SQL+
Unit 1 Spark SQL read a Hive table  - Preview
Unit 2 Write to Parquet using Spark SQL & Dataframe  - Preview
Unit 3 Read from Parquet with Spark SQL & Dataframe  - Preview
Unit 4 ⏯ Spark SQL basics video tutorial  - Preview
Module 9 Spark streaming+
Unit 1 Spark streaming text files  - Preview
Unit 2 Spark file streaming in Java  - Preview
Unit 3 ⏯ Spark streaming video tutorial  - Preview
Top